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Logic, Argumentation, and Persuasion

The purpose of this powerful new series from Lenné Eidson Espenschied is to help lawyers develop a practical, working knowledge of the principles of logic, argumentation, and persuasion. “Logic” is a study of the principles of sound reasoning; “Argumentation” is the process of reasoning systematically to support a proposition; “Persuasion” is the process by which a person’s attitudes are influenced by communications from other people. This four-part web series will take place on Thursdays in June 2022.

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Thursdays, June 2022
Live via Webcast 

Program Creator and Speaker: Lenné Eidson Espenschied, Next Level Contracts

June 2nd  1:00 – 2:00pm  
Part 1 - 10 Informal Logical Fallacies
The purpose of this powerful new series is to help lawyers develop a practical, working knowledge of the principles of logic, argumentation, and persuasion. “Logic” is a study of the principles of sound reasoning; “Argumentation” is the process of reasoning systematically to support a proposition; “Persuasion” is the process by which a person’s attitudes are influenced by communications from other people. In Part 1, we’ll focus on ten common informal logical fallacies, discussing how they are formulated; how to recognize them; how to use them; and how to refuse them in legal arguments and in contract negotiations. 

June 9th  1:00 – 2:00pm    
Part 2 – Is That a Fact?
Classical logic is built upon premises that are presumed to be true, but what exactly is “true” and how does it differ from fact? A recent Pew Survey revealed that 64% of knowledgeable, savvy Americans could not distinguish properly between five factual statements and five opinion statements; the unknowledgeable, unsavvy Americans fared far worse. In this fascinating program, Part 2 of Logic, Argumentation, Persuasion, we’ll examine the differences between facts, inferences, beliefs, opinions, and norms. We’ll use this information to help you construct more convincing, logical arguments and enhance your credibility in litigation and transactional practice, as well as in casual conversations. We’ll also consider:

  •         How “social facts” influence individual behavior
  •         How “norms” differ from “values”
  •         Whether “facts” are always reliable evidence
  •         How data differs from information

June 16th  1:00 – 2:00pm  
Part 3 – Convince Me
How convincing are you? From time to time, all lawyers must convince someone of something, whether in contract negotiations or litigation. In this program, Part 3 of Logic, Argumentation, and Persuasion, we’ll show you how to use classical logical syllogisms to construct more compelling arguments. We’ll consider formal logical fallacies that undermine your proposition and reduce your chances for success. We’ll review convincing syllogisms from several recent SCOTUS cases. You’ll learn this and more:

  •         The differences between conditional, categorical, and disjunctive syllogisms, and when to use each
  •         How to construct a valid syllogism
  •         Six different kinds of formal logical fallacies, and how to avoid them
  •         When to use deductive reasoning
  •         When to use inductive reasoning

June 23rd  1:00 – 2:00pm   
Part 4 – 4 Key Elements of Superpower Persuasion
If you could choose your own superpower, what would it be? The power of persuasion enables virtually all other pursuits, so it ranks high on the list of preferred superpowers for lawyers. In this program, Part 4 of Logic, Argumentation, and Persuasion, we’ll showcase four different methods to enhance your power of persuasion. We’ll consider four classical rhetorical strategies and when to use them. We’ll provide specific phrases to effectively articulate your position and practical techniques to connect our ideas. You’ll learn this and more:

  •         When to use logos, pathos, and kairos in arguments
  •         12 rhetorical phrases to presage your perspective
  •         6 ways to build coherence between ideas
  •         5 literary devices for driving a point home
Live Webcast
4-part live webcast series, Thursdays in June 2022.
SKU: P2205-22W
$200.00
decrease increase
e-learn
Now available for pre-order. Sessions will be added to your IICLE account shortly following the live webcasts.
SKU: P2205-22E
$200.00
decrease increase

Thursdays, June 2022
Live via Webcast 

Program Creator and Speaker: Lenné Eidson Espenschied, Next Level Contracts

June 2nd  1:00 – 2:00pm  
Part 1 - 10 Informal Logical Fallacies
The purpose of this powerful new series is to help lawyers develop a practical, working knowledge of the principles of logic, argumentation, and persuasion. “Logic” is a study of the principles of sound reasoning; “Argumentation” is the process of reasoning systematically to support a proposition; “Persuasion” is the process by which a person’s attitudes are influenced by communications from other people. In Part 1, we’ll focus on ten common informal logical fallacies, discussing how they are formulated; how to recognize them; how to use them; and how to refuse them in legal arguments and in contract negotiations. 

June 9th  1:00 – 2:00pm    
Part 2 – Is That a Fact?
Classical logic is built upon premises that are presumed to be true, but what exactly is “true” and how does it differ from fact? A recent Pew Survey revealed that 64% of knowledgeable, savvy Americans could not distinguish properly between five factual statements and five opinion statements; the unknowledgeable, unsavvy Americans fared far worse. In this fascinating program, Part 2 of Logic, Argumentation, Persuasion, we’ll examine the differences between facts, inferences, beliefs, opinions, and norms. We’ll use this information to help you construct more convincing, logical arguments and enhance your credibility in litigation and transactional practice, as well as in casual conversations. We’ll also consider:

  •         How “social facts” influence individual behavior
  •         How “norms” differ from “values”
  •         Whether “facts” are always reliable evidence
  •         How data differs from information

June 16th  1:00 – 2:00pm  
Part 3 – Convince Me
How convincing are you? From time to time, all lawyers must convince someone of something, whether in contract negotiations or litigation. In this program, Part 3 of Logic, Argumentation, and Persuasion, we’ll show you how to use classical logical syllogisms to construct more compelling arguments. We’ll consider formal logical fallacies that undermine your proposition and reduce your chances for success. We’ll review convincing syllogisms from several recent SCOTUS cases. You’ll learn this and more:

  •         The differences between conditional, categorical, and disjunctive syllogisms, and when to use each
  •         How to construct a valid syllogism
  •         Six different kinds of formal logical fallacies, and how to avoid them
  •         When to use deductive reasoning
  •         When to use inductive reasoning

June 23rd  1:00 – 2:00pm   
Part 4 – 4 Key Elements of Superpower Persuasion
If you could choose your own superpower, what would it be? The power of persuasion enables virtually all other pursuits, so it ranks high on the list of preferred superpowers for lawyers. In this program, Part 4 of Logic, Argumentation, and Persuasion, we’ll showcase four different methods to enhance your power of persuasion. We’ll consider four classical rhetorical strategies and when to use them. We’ll provide specific phrases to effectively articulate your position and practical techniques to connect our ideas. You’ll learn this and more:

  •         When to use logos, pathos, and kairos in arguments
  •         12 rhetorical phrases to presage your perspective
  •         6 ways to build coherence between ideas
  •         5 literary devices for driving a point home
Products specifications
Program DateThursdays, June 2022
Products specifications
Program DateThursdays, June 2022
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